Prenatal phthalate exposure and male genital development

Study finds inverse association between mothers’ urinary phthalate levels and free testosterone blood levels in early pregnancy; lower free testosterone in mothers associated with higher prevalence of genital abnormalities in baby boys

Endocrine disruptors and sperm quality

Column in The New York Times discusses decreasing sperm quality and fertility in men, explains links to exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals

Public consultation: EFSA guidance on substances in baby food

EFSA publishes draft guidance on the risk assessment of substances in food for infants younger than 16 weeks; public consultation open until March 31, 2017

“Should I worry about plastics?”

BBC2 report investigates chemical exposure from plastic food packaging and consults with leading toxicologists; likely no concern for average adults; reducing plastic use recommended

Children exposed to lead from water and food

Formula-fed infants and toddlers in U.S. exposed to lead mainly from water and food, respectively, according to new report by Environmental Protection Agency

Population-level effects of toxic chemicals

Article by Silent Spring Institute discusses exposure to toxic chemicals and outlines how small influences on the health of individuals can translate into significant negative impacts on public health as a whole

Summary on estrogenic chemicals and reproductive health

PLOS Biology article highlights reproductive health impacts of estrogenic chemicals such as bisphenol A, its analogues, and phthalates

Scientific consensus on environmental neurotoxins

Project TENDR consensus statement calls for action against environmental chemicals affecting children’s brains and contributing to disorders such as autism, ADHD, and learning disabilities

Early puberty in girls

The Wall Street Journal discusses early onset of puberty in U.S. girls; obesity and exposure to EDCs considered key factors, according to experts

BPA and hyperactivity in children

New study finds association between higher urinary BPA levels and prevalence of ADHD in U.S. children