Online tool to protect children from chemical exposures

Swedish Chemicals Agency publishes website with information and advice on children’s everyday exposure to chemicals, includes section on food and food contact materials

Focus on ‘BPA-free’ products

Article discusses common BPA substitutes and whether products labeled ‘BPA-free’ are safer

More evidence on hazard potential of BPA and BPS

Endocrine Society highlights 3 scientific studies investigating effects of bisphenol A and its common substitute bisphenol S on body weight, liver development, and breast cancer

Steep decline in sperm counts of Western men

New study finds 50-60% decline in sperm counts between 1973 and 2011 among men from Europe, North America, Australia and New Zealand; authors see declining sperm counts as signal of risk to men’s overall health

Children significantly exposed to EDCs and neurotoxins

Danish EPA assesses risk of young and unborn children’s exposure to endocrine disruptors and neurotoxins; phthalates, bisphenol A, and lead identified among most critical substances

Lead in U.S. baby food

New study by Environmental Defense Fund finds U.S. baby foods more frequently contaminated with lead than regular non-baby foods, urges FDA and manufacturers to reduce children’s exposure to lead

Better protection of children from toxics needed

Opinion article in New York Times outlines children’s prenatal exposure to various toxic chemicals, discusses impact on fetal brain development and health consequences

EFSA guidance on substances in infant food

EFSA issues new guidance on the risk assessment of substances in food intended for infants younger than 16 weeks; guidance applies from now on to EFSA food safety assessments

Hazardous chemicals in the diet

Environmental Defense Fund blog post summarizes potentially dangerous chemicals present in food and food packaging; urges U.S. Congress and FDA to take action

Prenatal phthalate exposure and male genital development

Study finds inverse association between mothers’ urinary phthalate levels and free testosterone blood levels in early pregnancy; lower free testosterone in mothers associated with higher prevalence of genital abnormalities in baby boys